Flyover state foods worth landing for

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Every state has a food that they are known for. We all know that Californians love their fish tacos, New Yorkers gotta get their chicken wings, and that Pennsylvanians simply can’t survive in an area without a Philly cheesesteak within three miles. While everyone may know these classics and staples of American cuisine, not everyone knows about the equally, if not more delicious delicacies from the middle of the country.

We decided to try them out, and here are the five most delectable dishes in the flyover states worth landing for.

Breaded pork tenderloin sandwich – Indiana

Sure, you’ve probably had a breaded pork tenderloin sandwich before, but you’ve probably never had one like the Hoosiers make it. Just like many other jewels hidden in the rest of the state, this sandwich appears normal and bland, but is a burst of flavor on the inside.

This is because this pounded flat pork tenderloin is marinated in buttermilk spiced with salt, pepper, paprika, garlic powder and onion powder. After marinating it, you take the cutlet and put it in flour, then an egg, then pan fry that puppy. The most important detail which separates this pork tenderloin sandwich from the rest however is the fact that the tenderloin itself has to be at least three times the size of the burger buns you’re putting it in.

Southern fried catfish – Arkansas

This southern staple is definitely done right and the best in Arkansas, home of the Arkansas River and where the confluence of immigrants from around the world each added their own touch to the mix.

The way to make this amazing, delectable, and juicy dish is to first sprinkle the catfish with both salt and black pepper before putting it in the flour. However, make sure to add some Hungarian paprika to that flour mix, otherwise you won’t be making true southern fried catfish. Pan fry both sides of the fish with the heat turned all the way up for 3 minutes on each side. Then that fish is ready to eat.

Kentucky hot browns – Kentucky

Coming from the bluegrass commonwealth of Kentucky (keep in mind, it’s a COMMONWEALTH not a state), the Kentucky hot brown is an open faced sandwich consisting of a slice of toasted white bread, roasted turkey, special Kentucky style Mornay sauce, and of course, bacon. There’s even a slice of tomato for y’all health conscious folks.

After roasting the turkey (or using leftovers which are just as good), toast the bread and cook the bacon. But the most important part of this state food is the mornay sauce, made by first mixing butter and flour in a pot on medium heat, whisking in milk on high heat, then adding in pecorino, cheddar, and nutmeg. Mmm Mmm delicious.

Buckeyes – Ohio

This state food of Ohio is just one of a plethora of things called buckeye in this buckeye state. A buckeye is a type of tree which has super hard, large, rock like seeds. Everything in Ohio – from the people to the sports teams to the state itself – are called buckeyes.

But to make this state food you can be anywhere. All you do is first make peanut butter balls from peanut butter, vanilla, salt, and melted butter, then freezing them. Afterwards, melt chocolate and shortening. Dip the peanut butter balls in the chocolate, leaving a small brown circle, and now you have a buckeye.

Funeral potatoes – Utah

Despite the sad name and the history of serving this dish at Mormon funerals, these potatoes are actually out of this world. Made with onions and garlic, what really makes this dish special is the crunchy cornflakes and tons upon tons of melted cheese on the top.

This casserole is made with both baked potatoes as well as hash browns, and includes everything from chopped onions and garlic, creamy melted cheese, unsweetened cornflakes, and tons of butter. This will soon become a family favorite.

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